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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
to be the targets here, but that there are ground force near the sites where the u.s. is targeting, that they could become casualties at this point. do you think, given what we do know about libya, this would be enough to motivate people to switch sides, to back off, to rethink their support of libya's strongman? >> as i said, it's really about momentum right now. if there's any sense the momentum is shifting against the gadhafi regime, we're likely to see additional defections. the only thing that reverses it is that gadhafi was still strong and he had a lot of tools as his disposal. it could happen. when you look at the u.n. resolution, everybody's been saying it's about civilians. but if you look at the text, it gives the international community and those carrying out the commission is it gives them tools. every target in libya is a legitimate target if it's tied to civilians. the mission is about defending civilians. you've already stated the u.s., the europeans, most of those who are part of the coalition really don't think they can live with gadhafi as president of libya. they see him has hav
nuke chenuclear plantse availablize ie izstabilizing. >>> we begin in libya. u.s. says coalition air strikes have established a no fly zone in the east soon to be extendeded to tripoli. richard engel, they say the operation went as well as could be expected. but there are a lot of questions remaining about whether we'll be able to turn this command over to whom and the opposition. how much do we though about the opposition in wlib qua and how do you distinguish between rebel forces and civilians? >> reporter: it's difficult to distinguish from rebel forces and civilians because the rebels until a few days ago or a few weeks ago were mostly civilians and they don't have a cheer leadership, they don't have uniforms. they don't have marked vehicles. and a lot of them are very undisciplined and up frofrnfo l unprofessional. they were trying to see how extensive the air and missile strikes were yesterday. today we were just out with rebel, watching them get into pickup trucks and head toward the front lines. we were watching rebels head to an area where they believe they have liberated m
a crew member of the u.s. fighter that crashed in libya. defense secretary gates testified at a congressional hearing. gates said he does not think the u.s. should arm those rebels. >> in terms of providing that training, in terms of providing assistance to them, frankly there are many countries that can do that. that's not a unique capability for the united states. and as far as i'm concerned, somebody else should do that. >> libya's foreign minister has defected to britain. musa kusa one of gadhafi's closest aides. he is suspects of masterminding the bombing of pan am flight 103 that killed 270 people. nbc news pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski joins me now. nato officially took control of the entire military mission in libya but the headline is about the cia operatives on the ground and what they are doing there. what can you tell juice u.s. military and intelligence officials say if they didn't, if the obama administration did not have cia operatives on the ground, this operation was not well thought out and would be in trouble. this is pretty much preforma in thi
stated that it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. we have a wide range of tools in addition to our military efforts to support that policy. >> the american people from the congress need to hear what our president believes his objectives are. if we are going into a war with libya, we should declare a war on libya. we should pull together with our allies and try to figure out a plan of how that war is to be won. these are things that must be debated here in washington apart from paris or at least encounters with other countries in which we say we'll hold your coat. we don't object to what you are up to. >>> good morning. welcome to morning joe. beautiful shot. times square. beautiful because i'm not there. i'm in dallas. mika is in the south of france trying to gather a feeling of the people in that beautiful part of the country. a story breaking suggesting that america, the united kingdom upset with the french leadership for overreaching. we are going to talk to mike barnicle about that. visiting professor, harlds ford junior and the great willie geist. pat buchanan and the host of
an international coalition as it takes all necessary measures. >> with u.s. allies taking the lead president obama is being briefed on developments while he is in brazil. >> our consensus was strong and resolve clear. the people of libya must be protected and in the absence of an immediate end to the violence against civilians, our coalition is prepared to act and act with urgency. >> the latest from benghazi shows tanks approaching the city have stopped as thick, black smoke rises from the rebel stronghold. with me right now from cairo, egypt is nbc's richard engel. richard, from your perspective, from your vantage point, how optimistic is the arab world that they can stop the violence toward civilians in libya? >> this is a, you have to understand what's going on in libya in the context of the wider middle east. the middle east is going through an incredible period of flux with revolts and uprisings and revolutions from north africa stretching all the way to the arabian peninsula. all arab governments are in the cross hairs right now, very unpopular with their people. there have been successful
in libya. how big of a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's perhaps, monday or tuesday of next week. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of a u.s. ally. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way, how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyon
. or remember this, the northern islands, u.s. commonwealth, a helpful map, look, it is a dot. the u.s. government did an investigation into working conditions there, and found that sweatshop workers there were not only working in sweatshop conditions, they were forced into prostitution. they were forced to have abortions. so maybe stuff being manufactured under those conditions, forced abortions, maybe the stuff of corporations shouldn't carry the made in the usa label. maybe they haven't earned that. in the mid 1990s, jack abramoff took on the northern mariana islands as a client and put tim phillips and ralph reed on the case. they got them to lobby their member of congress in favor of forced abortion, forced prostitution sweatshop on the grounds that the chinese laborers were being introduced to jesus while they were there. presumably, that was between the forced abortions and forced prostitution. i asked him about it when we had him on the show in 2009. his answer was essentially, you know, that was a really long time ago. may have been a long time ago. dude still has the same bas
and a cell phone. >>> president obama insists the u.s. had to get involved in libya to stop a massacre, and right now, secretary of state hillary clinton is in london, meeting with leaders from around the globe to figure out what to do about moammar gadhafi. here's what she said just moments ago. we don't have that, but we do have from the president last night in his nationally televised speech, where he promised ground troops would not be used to remove moammar gadhafi. and to prove that point, he took a page out of history. >> to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. thanks to the extraordinary sacrifices of our troops, and the determination of our diplomats, we are hopeful about iraq's future. but regime change there took eight years, thousands of american and iraqi lives, and nearly $1 trillion. that is not something we can afford to repeat in libya. >> the speech is doing little to calm gop critics this morning, including house speaker john boehner. he says americans still have no answer to the fundamental question, what does success in libya look like? and one of the presiden
to his people. i also have stated that it is u.s. policy that qaddafi needs to go go. and we've got a wide range of tools in our military efforts to support that policy. we were very rapid in initiating unilateral sanctions and then helping to mobilize international sanctions against the qaddafi regime. >> rose: joining me now from the eastern city of tobruk is richard engel, chief foreign correspondent for nbc news. >> it's a pleasure, charlie. >> rose: what's your sense of this war? what factors on the ground influence the way you see it? >> the rebels here obviously are very excited that they finally have international support, particularly american support they feel that they have suddenly been recognized by the greatest military in the world, the u.s. military, and that army and air strikes and naval strikes will carry them to tripoli. i'm not sure if that's what the intended message is from the united states but it's how it's been perceived here and the rebel strategy seems to be allow the air strikes to continue to decimate qaddafi's army and they can do this very slow march
it comes to how the u.s. would get involved in, say, a syria or a yemen or pbahrain. it seems as if officials today, the whole goal of this briefing was to make sure reporters understood that libya was not a precedent for anything. >> well, it was very striking this weekend on "meet the press" to watch secretary gates and secretary clinton trying to define first from the defense secretary, defining what is in our national interests. this was gates first and then clinton. >> no, i don't think it's vital interest for the united states, but we clearly have interests there and it's a part of the region which is a vital interest for the united states. >> i think a lot of people would hear that and say that's quite striking. not in our vital interests and yet we're committing military resources to it. >> but then it wouldn't be fair to what bob just said. did hib ilibya attack us? no, they did not attack us. >> but they did have interest with our allies and our allies have been standing with the united states in afghanistan for a decade when they were not attacked. so that's the cas
fighting they captured a key city and held by punishing air strikes from u.s. and coalition forces. nbc news chief foreign correspondent richened engel is on the ground. richard, good morning. >> good morning, lester. we are on the outskirts of ajdabiya. this town clearly taken by the rebels and with considerable help. you can see beind me one of gadhafi's tanks that was obliterated by air strikes. the rebels have pushed about 50 miles to the west of here. so, advancing their frontline in the past 24 hours or so. they say they will continue this until they can reach some more gadhafi-held territory. this is a rebel now counteroffensive under way, assisted by the western airstrikes. lester? >> richer, the nato officials say they're not trying to actively assist the rebels but in trying to protect civilians. their bombs are helping. how far can the rebels advance and is gadhafi's army, in fact, crumbling? >> gadhafgadhafi's army certain this area is crumbling. when you look on the ground, we've seen 20 armored vehicles destroyed from the air. it seems this is not just a defensive operatio
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)

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